Viral Content Sharing Report: Profiles

To contact me about speaking at your event click here.

[hidepost]
I used data from the first 15 questions to segment respondents into 6 profiles based on usage of various types of websites:

  1. Frequent Twitter users vs non-Twitter users
  2. Users that frequently read social news websites vs those that do not
  3. Bloggers vs non-bloggers
  4. Frequent Facebook users vs those that do not use Facebook
  5. Users that frequently read blogs vs respondents that do not read blogs
  6. People who read forums frequently vs people who do not read forums

I compared users who reported frequently engaging in specific types of web activity (the profile) with users who reported never engaging in this activity (the control). When analyzing the data, I focused on areas where the profile differed from the control to identify ways to target each of these profiles.

Across the board, we see that users who are engaged with a specific type of web activity tend to share more often and with more people than the average. This also means that these respondents generally selected more sources and types than the average. When looking at the data from the type and source questions, it is important to note answers where the difference between the profile and the control is greater than the difference between the other answers. We also see that users who report “frequently” using web sites and activities questioned demonstrated a pattern of behavior that included preferring to share news and opinion rather than humorous content.

Frequent Twitter users vs non-Twitter users

Reach and frequency data shows that respondents who use Twitter frequently (45.7% of respondents) share content both individually and one-to-many more frequently and with more people than those who reported using Twitter “never” (44.3% of respondents). The difference was greatest when looking at one-to-many sharing, due to the fact that Twitter use itself is one-to-many. Twitter users also tend to spread content from blogs and social news sites much more often than non-Twitterers, while being less likely to share content originating from emails they’ve received. When we look at the types of content frequent Twitter users share, we see that news, opinions and instructionals are favorites, while non-Twitter users prefer to spread humor, alerts and fiction.








Users that frequently read social news websites vs those that do not

Similar to Twitter users, those who often read social news websites (33.7% of respondents) tend to share content more frequently and to more people in both individual and one-to-many contexts than those who do not read social news sites (34.98% of respondents). The most pronounced difference here is that social news readers reported reaching many more people when sharing one-to-many. Again, we see that users engaged frequently in certain web activities (in this case social news) share more content from sources like blogs, Twitter and forums, while non-social-readers share from Facebook and emails in both individual and one-to-many contexts. Social readers also exhibit the proclivity to share news, opinion, and instructional content more than non-social-readers. In an interesting deviation from the Twitter user comparison above, they also share warnings and fiction more than the control group.








Bloggers vs non-bloggers

Frequent blog writers (32.8% of respondents) tend to share more frequently and with more people than non-bloggers (32.4% of respondents), and the disparity is most evident in the amount of people they report reaching when sharing in a one-to-many way. This is likely do to the fact that as bloggers, they have the high-reach publishing tool of blog CMSs at their disposal. Again, as I expected, bloggers tend to share content from other blogs much more frequently than non-bloggers, and in fact share content more frequently from every source other than Facebook in individual sharing contexts. Bloggers show analogous tendencies in their choice of content types when sharing, favoring news, opinion and instruction over humor and fiction. They show a slight propensity to share warnings, but when taken in the context of their much higher volume of sharing than non-bloggers, this is inconsequential.








Frequent Facebook users vs those that do not use Facebook

While frequent Facebook users (36.7% of respondents) do share content more often and with more people than non-Facebook users (24.5% of respondents), the differences are not as pronounced as in the other profile studies. The biggest difference is in the frequency with which Facebookers share content individually; since they share more frequently, the data shows they share individually from every source other than forums more often, this is probably due to the fact that Facebook provides many of the same features as forums, so users of the social network don’t need to use forums as much. Frequent Facebook users also tend to share content in one-to-many styles from every source other than forums and emails more than those who do not use Facebook. Facebook users tend to individually share news and opinion more than non-Facebookers, and they share content in a one-to-many fashion more often for every type other than humor and warnings.








Users who frequently read blogs vs respondents who do not read blogs

Conforming to the high-engagement behavioral pattern, we see that users who read blogs frequently (58% of respondents) share content more frequently and with more people, both individually and in one-to-many ways, than respondents who reported reading blogs “never” (10% of respondents). The biggest difference was in the number of other people users reported reaching when they shared one-to-many. For individual sharing, Facebook, IM and email all tend to be more important sources of content for non-blog-readers than for frequent blog readers. In a one-to-many context, blog readers share content from more sources than do non-readers, but especially from other blogs, social news sites and forums. Again, we see that the engaged profile (frequent blog readers) are more likely to share news, opinion, instructional content and warnings individually than non-blog readers, and the differences are even more pronounced for one-to-many sharing.








People who read forums frequently vs people who do not read forums

Frequent forum readers (31.4% of respondents) do share content more frequently and with more people than those who do not read forums(16.2% of respondents), but the differences are not as pronounced as those of the other profiles I studied. For the other profiles, the differences tended to be at the high end (more people sharing very frequently or with a lot of people), the differences in this segment tend to be in the mid-range of sharing behavior. Forum readers also differ from the other profiles in that they only significantly favor sharing content from blogs and social sites in comparison with non-forum readers. The major difference in preferred content types for this segment is that they share instructional content much more than the control.







Next: High-Reach and High-Frequency Sharing.
[/hidepost]
Viral Content Sharing Report: Table of Contents